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#10234 - 01/11/07 09:46 PM Re: The path to the magic forrest ?
Tom Cundiff Offline
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Registered: 04/20/99
Posts: 245
Loc: Grafton, IL. USA
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#10236 - 01/12/07 02:40 AM Re: The path to the magic forrest ?
Raphael D. Swift Offline
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Registered: 05/18/04
Posts: 286
Loc: Warren, CT.
Another great picture and interesting timing I was plunging through an 18" Hickory today and got to thinking about this thread, after I was through.

I definitely have to change chains on my MS660 as soon as I've got my 066 back up and running and definitely before tackling Stumpkins or plunging posts.

I guess you'ld have to call my chains pro-kickback chains rather than anti-kickback, or perhaps semipro-kickback as they are low profile. But they are all ground ten degrees so you've got a real jack hammer if the back side of the bar gets too involved in the plunge. They'll also turn limbing into a real blood sport if you aren't paying attention.

Milton mentioned a "safety chain built for boring", who makes this chain? I'd thought the number one drawback of a safety chain was you couldn't plunge with them.
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#10237 - 01/12/07 08:02 AM Re: The path to the magic forrest ?
Tom Cundiff Offline
Member

Registered: 04/20/99
Posts: 245
Loc: Grafton, IL. USA
I know that Baileys had a safety chain for their carving bars (1/4" pitch). Maybe it is different from the Sthil safety chain, It doesn't plunge well at all. Sometimes I will make the initial plunges with my 036 without low kick back chain. Then switch to the MS250 with safety chain for "flossing". laugh
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#10238 - 01/12/07 07:48 PM Re: The path to the magic forrest ?
Raphael D. Swift Offline
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Registered: 05/18/04
Posts: 286
Loc: Warren, CT.
I picked up an 026pro on eBay for doing things like "flossing", but it has issues and also is an 026 with a "pro" sticker added later. :rolleyes:
Right now it's a project I'll get to it when I have time or money again.

I used to have a nice little Remington about the size of the MS250, it ran a 3/8 pitch low profile chain on a hard nosed bar. That was a nice saw to work with, I had its nose working in a lot of Cedar for several years.
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Raphael D. Swift
DBA: DreamScapes

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#10239 - 01/12/07 09:32 PM Re: The path to the magic forrest ?
Tom Cundiff Offline
Member

Registered: 04/20/99
Posts: 245
Loc: Grafton, IL. USA
Does your 026 have the decompression release on top , I think that is the diference between the 026 and the 026 PRO. Both are good saws.
Tom
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#10240 - 01/12/07 11:39 PM Re: The path to the magic forrest ?
Raphael D. Swift Offline
Member

Registered: 05/18/04
Posts: 286
Loc: Warren, CT.
No compression release and it's not got the adjustable oiler either. I can live without the decompression but being able to crank the oiling up and down is kind of important.

The "Pro" sticker is also not in a position I've seen Stihl place them, but I'm not a "Stihl historian".

The current oiler is one of the saws issues, it'll get oil on you, the timber, and the ground but the chain is running a little to dry.

It does have the heated handles option, which I thought was a nice bonus, and that part actually works correctly.
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DBA: DreamScapes

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#10241 - 01/17/07 09:08 PM Re: The path to the magic forrest ?
milton Offline

Member

Registered: 02/06/99
Posts: 78
Loc: Jackson,NH,USA
Greetings all:
In my reference to boring chain I was speaking of chain that I bought in PA. The Stihl dealer was used to selling chains into the veneer choppers market where boring makes money, the wood is hard and the saws are plenty powerful.

Stihl Duromatic (hard nose no roller) and rsc3 and rmc3 chains are what I am familiar with. AS with any special operations: just ask the guys and gals that sell and use the stuff.

All chain companies will sell you their best for any task.

All that said: never blame the tool or the advice of others, and never stand down range of the top of the chain. Plunge cutting is scary stuff,the lucky get a second chance to fail, chain speed is but one key to the task. If it isn't sharp, stop now.

Happy carving,
Curtis

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