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Best resource for scribe rule? #12559 08/17/07 03:51 PM
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brad_bb Offline OP
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I learned square rule in my timberframe class, but I want to understand scribe rule in case I decide to use irregular timber or a natural log section. What is the best source for me to learn and understand the technique and setup/layout? I'd prefer a book or website as I don't have the extra money or vacation time to take another class.

Re: Best resource for scribe rule? [Re: brad_bb] #12560 08/17/07 04:17 PM
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mo Offline
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Brad, the Guilds Green Book (Volume II) has some information on Scribing methods. A great book.


Re: Best resource for scribe rule? [Re: brad_bb] #12584 08/21/07 12:30 AM
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Meddins Offline
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What would be really nice is if someone would upload to Youtube a video of a timber being French Scribed. Surely there's footage out there of scribing in action. If Josh Jackson or Dave Carlon read posts on this forum...how about it fellas? While books and manuals provide a good introduction to the subject, there's something about scribing that really necessitates it being seen in action. Thanks,

Miles

Re: Best resource for scribe rule? [Re: Meddins] #12586 08/21/07 03:09 AM
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toivo Offline
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here's what comes up on a video search for french scribe:

Eugene Oregon! Floater's Danny Shmoup (Boy)
grade narcolepsy and a penchant for buggery. My mother was a fifteen year old French prostitute named Chloe with webbed feet. My father would womanize, he would Floater's classic Redux...like Apocalypse Now Redux (but just movie song thing, very nice!)

Not affiliated with or endorsed by the band Floater...but they are a great band from Eugene, Oregon and you should check them out.
The details of my life are quite inconsequential... very well, where do I begin? My father was a relentlessly self-improving boulangerie owner from Belgium with low... (more) (less)

From: jaddilac
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Added: 4 months ago
Time: 03:42

not very instructive.

is it true that one can stack a number of timbers and mark them all at once with a plumb from a pattern on the floor? could this technique be worked with wonky timbers, is that what you're thinking BB? actually, thinking of it, this could work (guessing): lay out the template on the floor; place the timber above, adjust to the outline with plumbbob; then map signifiacant intersections to the timber, including the ends; connect points on the timber with straight edge; cut. is this how it goes?

Re: Best resource for scribe rule? [Re: toivo] #12590 08/21/07 12:16 PM
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Gabel Offline
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toivo,

That's more or less how it goes, although many plumb-line scribers don't loft (work off of full-scale layout lines on the floor), particularly in the UK.

Now might be a good time to mention that there will be a 2 part plumb-line scribing demonstration/talk at the Eastern Conference in October.


Gabel

Last edited by Gabel; 08/21/07 12:19 PM. Reason: added conference plug
Re: Best resource for scribe rule? [Re: Gabel] #12592 08/21/07 10:00 PM
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brad_bb Offline OP
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Toivo, I couldn't make sense of your post but the last part. Please don't drink and type smile

I understand to layout on the floor(hopfully one that was poured pretty flat). I'm thinking that your "wonky" timber is above held up by timber ponies. I'm thinking that If you have the mortise drawn on the floor, you hang the plumb bob against the wonky timber until you find the corners and mark them? But if the face is curved, how to project square lines? In square rule, we were very precise with marking layout with a razor knife. How can you make markings that accurate on the floor? Boy I'm all confused. Thats why I need help to understand this.

Re: Best resource for scribe rule? [Re: brad_bb] #12594 08/22/07 12:11 AM
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mo Offline
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First, you must think of everything being plumb and level. You could place level marks on timbers with flat areas or areas that have been flattened. These level marks are one of your references for the timber. The level marks should be perpendicular to grain. If the timber is really windy use some winding sticks and find the happy medium, then place a level mark there. A level mark is signified with two lines with an "X" running to the corners of the two lines and the edges. Level both longitudinally and tangentially your primary pieces. Those are the ones such as your posts, rafters, ties, of course there can be exceptions.

How about an example. You want to scribe a bent with post, lowered tie, braces (of course), king post, rafters, braces.

For ease (because like it was stated you need to get someone to show you this, and again you should also get the Green Book and read that) we are going to scribe the tie to the posts.

1. Pick your posts and tie. This involves looking at the faces and deciding which faces should go where in the building.
2. Put them on bunks and look at their character (this is where the wind and other charateristics need to be noticed). Assign your level mark (perpendicular to grain). Any flat area will do. If you can't find one flatten one.
3. Chances are you are scribing because your timbers are not regular and therefore your level mark when you place your level on it is not level. At this point you want to keep your level on its mark and use shims under the timbers to level that mark. Level the level mark.
4. At this point you need to assign reference lines on your timbers down the pertinent faces. In short you are creating long lines to level. So take your torpedo level that is on your level level mark and go to each end of the timber.
5. At each end place a plumb line and level line all the way across the end grain. The french run this through the center and others do it other ways. The importance is you are establishing two planes perpendicular to each other. You have to have some mode of reference in building (especially with irregular timbers).
6. Connect each of the two corresponding points on each face and chalk.
7. Take your post and place them on whatever bunks are comfortable.
8. Arrange them by chalk lines that represent the outside faces by using the floor, or you can use the lines down your faces to measure the right span. Get them where they need to be when they are standing. Check your level mark for level and level those longitudinal face chalk lines as well.
9. Now place the tie on top of the posts in its proper placement using the chalk lines (your mode of reference) to measure height.
10. Make sure your tie is level both ways as well. This might require some more shimming.
11. Now is when you use a plumb line, pencil, sharp eyes, and dividers.
12. This is the point where words won't work.
13. Braces can be a little trickier
14. DONT BUMP ANYTHING!
15. Again, All of your reference lines and tools work on
PLUMB AND LEVEL.

It is quite possible that I left something out or something in that is debatable, but hopefully you get the idea.

Last edited by mo; 08/22/07 12:12 AM.
Re: Best resource for scribe rule? [Re: mo] #12599 08/22/07 02:38 AM
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Mark Davidson Offline
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Thanks mo. This is the kind of post that makes this forum valuable.

Re: Best resource for scribe rule? [Re: Mark Davidson] #12653 08/25/07 01:18 AM
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northern hewer Offline
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Hi all

Please enlighten me as iI try and follow along, Is the timber being referred to rough hewn or sawn, or does it really matter, I suspect not, but then maybe

NH

Re: Best resource for scribe rule? [Re: northern hewer] #12663 08/25/07 09:31 PM
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mo Offline
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You can scribe any type of timber. Some timbers (like hewn) ask to be scribed more than others. It seems that it is also an advantage to scribe bents when you do not want to do the geometry needed on a scaled drawing to find placement of secondary pieces such as king post to rafter braces, etc. You can simply take the straighest and truest of all timbers and place to your suiting. Then scribe. I guess it is a question of taste, efficiency, and whichever method suits the carpenter better.

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