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Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35955 04/09/22 12:13 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi Ken

Nice to hear from you,
It looks l Ike you have a great project on the go there, wish I was closer would be visiting the site.
I envy your older history compared to North America, which it seems is a melting pot of different nationalities who immigrated from about 1500 on
Where I reside here in Canada german influences predominated, my family immigrated in 1710 from Germany to England to New England, and then finally up into Dundas county in Ontario, we stayed loyal to thebritish crown during the war of independence because of the help we received at the previous time by the queen of England at that time.
It is great once again to hear from you, the U.K. Is fortunate to have you and you family part of their heritage movement

Richard casselman
The northern hewer

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35956 04/09/22 07:11 AM
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Ken Hume Offline
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Hi Richard,

Thank you for those kind words and historical background information.

I have now learned that training for the Saxon Hall project will likely be held at McCurdy & Co's workshops at Stanford Dingley, Berkshire, England sometime in June 2022. This is a terrific opportunity for those persons looking to break into the field of timber framing to learn basic skills and maybe more importantly to make contact and network with England's premier timber framers.

Ken


Looking back to see the way ahead !
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35959 04/30/22 08:01 AM
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Ken Hume Offline
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Further information on the Saxon house build project at Cogges Manor Farm has now been issued including :-

Blenheim Palace has very kindly donated 30 trees to make the frame and these trees will be selected by McCurdy & Co along with the Cogges project manager.

McCurdy & Co has submitted plans to Cogges Manor Farm for their review and has confirmed that opportunities will exist for 12 volunteer carpenters to work with McCurdy & Co in Reading, Berkshire, England.

For additional information as this emerges check out the Oxfordshire Woodland Group Twitter feed


Looking back to see the way ahead !
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35960 06/13/22 12:11 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi Ken
Thanks for the update, keep us posted on its progress, and if you can some pics would be welcome I am sure by those looking in

Richard
The northern hewer

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35962 08/11/22 01:48 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonite
Well been quite a summer here,trying to deal with the virus, and just recently deal ing with family shaking accident, the heat and humidity is really trying everyone.
It made me remember the days gone by, no air conditioning, no indoor plumbing, you know just about nothing we all take for granted today.
It makes me think of growing up in the times during ww2, didn't really know what was happening in the rest of the world, now. We seem to know too much, I really feel sorry for those involved
You know though I m glad t o have experienced first hand, some of those old hardships, I learned at an early age how to cut down trees safely, plant gardens, kill and dress, and preserve meat without refrigeration, have light without electricity, and oh yes as the years rolled by enjoy dancing, and movie theatres, couldn't go in and have a beer till I was 21, but having said that I could go to war, drive a car, get married, funny world.

Well bye for now glad to be able yet to come on line a chat with you guys and gals

NH
Richard

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35975 12/06/22 04:35 PM
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Mark Davidson Offline
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wow this thread has really become a super topic!
I did a lot of hewing when I started out in timber framing,
now I do a lot of design and barn repair.
I appreciate those who carry on using hand tools, using body energy to shape the wood.
Thanks to Northern Hewer for this mammoth thread of information.
-Mark at www.wpltree.ca

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35976 12/10/22 07:03 PM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonite

Hello to you mark, and thanks for your kind words
I've met many people in person and on line, and at seminars, you are one of them!
One thing I really don't know how to handle, is how to ensure that things I have learned and documented are handed down and preserved for future generations.

For instance operating the Muley mill at UCV and repairing it, or re building certain aspects of its architecture from scratch, usually contain information that is not available, like the power source, the horizontal barrel wheel, and it's connecting linkages that operate the blade, and at the same time the forward motion of the log frame, carrying the log into the blade at precicsely the right time.

Many would say, oh well just a cup of tea, well understanding old technology at times comes with question marks! I know I've run up against these so called question marks, not much help out there available, you are on your own!

One aspect that I run up against that no help was available was restoring the 12" oak axle from scratch for the barrel wheel

It contained 2 cast iron Gudgeons one on each end babbited in .place, secured also with original wrought iron rings 2 on each end that were on turned surfaces helping to secure positively each of theGudgeons

alittle further up on the ends of shaft, were turned surfaces that large36" cast collars with moulded cups came to rest ,these had to come to rest approx 3 sixteenth of an inch from the side of the pressure box, this gap closed up as the box swelled, at the same time it could not be tight enough to stop rotation of the shaft!

Try to find this information in old millwrights books, good luck!

Remember you only had on kick at the can, if you messed up on any one aspect during your reconstruction, it was game over for the turned shaft! Start over!

How hot would you heat the babbit?

Was the oak log for turning be green, partly dried, or kiln dried , very Important, because of ramifications as the re construction moved along.

Well I hope you guys and gals enjoy my ramblings

Richard casselman
Nh

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35977 02/01/23 10:42 PM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi ken
Just wondering how your project is coming along, leave it to you guys over there to take very seriously the reconstruction of old architecture! , and take seriously preservation of the remaining/surviving examples.

I worked diligently to try to,retain for future generations old disapearing early building styles that included barns and out buildings

I knew there would be many missed for various reasons, so I filmed and documented and store d this information in the UCV archives.

My father always said that there was more than one way to build A structure and as I exa mined many I noticed outside similarities, but inside differences

Many exhibited their fatherland,s imprint, at least here in Canada, and at times hard to definitively put a finger on the builder,s origin---German/Dutch barns a good example

Well bye for now
Nh

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35978 02/02/23 12:46 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone this cold night

You know as I reflect on things, take the subject of timberframing and its different forms ie: light, heavy, extra heavy, super extra heavy like mill framing, and bridge framing.

Mill framing had to take into account many features like positioning of the powering unit, whether it was a turbine, one of the many types of water wheels, be it overshot, undershot, breast wheel, or barrel wheel, the later being one I am quite familiar with. Vibration of many sorts ie: rumbling (grinding stones), back and forth motion(Muley saw mills), with their extra long lateral x braces on each level. And the list goes on!

Church framing, especially the ceiling trusses, were s pectacular, and of many styles, some trusses strong enough to carry the immense weight of the steeples. One in particular that I documented had a span of 45 feet, and incorporated a bridge truss in its wide span not only to support the truss,s weight but the ponderous weight of the 50 foot high,heavy framed spire, it was something to behold.

I'm sure the parishioners sitting below , had no idea what was above their head!

Well I have to go but am enjoying these chats, thanks to the great people in TFG that make it. Possible !

Richard casselman
The northern hewer

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35979 02/02/23 09:32 PM
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Hello everyone tonite

Just to continue my ramblings about historic framing, I find it a fascinating topic, that like a road has many intersections leading to new knowledge on the subject depending on its style of building, or its many uses, which in most cases creates the type and strength of the framing used in its creation.

I'd just like to inject a personal observation, through my many years of actual association with this subject
First --to create a replica of a building structure destined for special preservation based on its special features, and maybe its probable demise through ownership, one needed to document every aspect of its original construction techniques, not a small task!, but having accomplished that ,acquiring the type and size of trees is also quite a task .

Let's remember right now, we need a true hewn surface, on each finished timber!, and you make no mistakes on the framing as you utilize each one, there are no spares!

Well got to go now

If you enjoy these chats, let the TFG know

Richard

NH

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