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Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #13141 10/26/07 09:24 PM
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timberwrestler Online Content
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Kevin,

One the people I learned to hew from is in Maine. Here's his website:
http://www.mudpond.net/
He's a great guy, good teacher, and his book is good as well. He does lessons, and he's also at the common ground fair. I met him at a Guild event, and having hewed only in the summer now, I don't recommend it. At all.

Brad



Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: timberwrestler] #13142 10/27/07 12:29 AM
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Kevin M Offline
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Hello Brad,

Thanks for the reference! I will definitely have to look into his book.

So, you don't recommend hewing at all? What difficulties in particular have you experienced or what haven't you liked about it? I notice that you are in Mass, where did you get your tools for hewing?

Kevin M.

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Kevin M] #13143 10/27/07 01:29 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi Kevin:

Mark gave you some very good information concerning the difference between the two types of timber surfaces.
The hewn surface is definitely alot more challenging to work with, and it will separate the men from the boys.

Having taught traditional timberframing courses using hewn material that as a group we prepared as part of the course, I have seen good tradesmen walk away from the layout work on the rough surfaces, saying that it took too much concentration.

To me I enjoy working with the hewn timbers, and in nearly every case the students would tell me that each time they now look at an old barn, home, or outbuilding that was created in years gone by, how they appreciate the work that must have went into its construction.

and Brad I also am really interested in your comment about not recommending hewing, especially when you took the time to attend a course and learn the skill. Could you broaden out your comment alittle I am sure for those that are viewing this thread.

thanks to everyone for joining in

NH


Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #13144 10/27/07 02:54 AM
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mo Offline
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"The hewn surface is definitely alot more challenging to work with, and it will separate the men from the boys."

With all due respect, I think that finding the purlin clip angle for a 8/12 pitch meeting a 12/12 pitch at a hip with 105 degree plates in plan separates.......

by the way I like hewn timbers, very rustic. How long does it take to hew an 8x8x10 timber (if you are efficient and precise) assuming that the diameter of the log is just big enough to accommodate the 8x8?

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: mo] #13146 10/28/07 12:29 AM
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Mark Davidson Offline
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hmmmm
one hour or less in pine, two hours or more in oak.
provided i've had my wheaties, of course.


Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Mark Davidson] #13148 10/28/07 12:46 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi Mo and others:

I am sure Mo that you are referring to using sawn surface timbers, try to do the same complicated layout using rough hewn surfaces, I am sure that there will be heard some muttering under their breath.

\NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Mark Davidson] #13149 10/28/07 12:51 AM
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jim haslip Offline
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Quote:
provided i've had my wheaties, of course.


or Brador??

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: jim haslip] #13152 10/28/07 03:24 AM
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Mark Davidson Offline
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I actually prefer oatmeal porridge.
hewing is a lot of fun for me. particularily hewing a long straight log in the forest where the tree falls.

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Mark Davidson] #13153 10/28/07 04:13 AM
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Mark Davidson Offline
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thought i should put a pic in for the adze as well
(-:

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Mark Davidson] #13172 10/30/07 04:15 PM
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I meant I don't recommend hewing in the summer. It's hot.

And for axes, I've used the new Gransfors axes, and several antique axes. I much prefer the finish of a single bevel, but I'm still looking for my perfect axe (certainly not as big as NH's). There are some pretty good antique stores in Maine.

I've also veneer hewed (I call it that) a lot of timbers. I cut the square rule joinery first, then skimmed about 1/8" off with a broad axe. Still sucks real bad in the summer with no shade.

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