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Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: TIMBEAL] #13981 01/19/08 01:29 PM
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Gabel Offline
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timbeal,

can you post a picture of your axe? In fact, I think we should all post pictures of our axes.

I'm with you timbeal on the big axes -- I use a Gransfors right-handed axe, but it's a little light. I am always on the lookout for an axe that might become my #1.

gabel

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Gabel] #13993 01/19/08 10:01 PM
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I will try, any tips on posting a picture, and make it simple. I will look around and see if it makes sense. Computers are not my thing. Tim

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: TIMBEAL] #13995 01/20/08 01:53 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi Timbeal

Can't say that I have, but one can always learn in this world.
My old dad always said that there was always more ways than one to fix any problem, and yours sounds like a good one in this modern world.

I unfortunately had to stick with historic solutions throughout my working life, and I enjoy hearing about modern solutions that others might pick up on.

Thanks again for taking part in this thread, and offering one of your solutions.

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14006 01/21/08 01:34 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Gabel and Timbel

I have a good view of one of my family hewing axe on the "TOOLS FOR SALE", You will have to scroll back a month or two in the archives of that thread

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14007 01/21/08 01:47 PM
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NH, that is a nice ax, curious if you still have it. I think you should keep it, being a family heirloom and all. I have a few tools my grand father used in boat building here on the coast of Maine. There were many more that were lost after he passed on, and it would of been nice to have access to them now. I think Mo posted a process for pictures I might try, but it is a stretch, for me. Tim

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: TIMBEAL] #14048 01/24/08 01:43 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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thanks timbeal for the kind words,

I have reconsidered selling and took the advice of many of you guys, although I know that someday when I am not here it will no doubt move along, but until then here it stays!!!

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14167 02/02/08 01:41 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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This is alittle off subject but during my working career, one of my jobs was to maintain an 1857 water powered muley sawmill, and its equipment.

One of the high maintenance items that needed continuous attention was a large wooden mallet called the "commander". It was used to tap in the the large wrought iron dogs that secured the ends of the logs during sawing.

What I am getting at is that during my years there I used every conceivable type of wood to manufacture the wooden heads from, they in turn were banded with iron rings to keep the ends from splitting,

Nothing ever seemed to work well or last long eventhough I enlisted the blacksmith to shrink on the rings, eventually the rings would work loose and fall away from the ends, and if the heads had developed a split the whole thing would fall apart.

The old photographs never seemed to show much detail to work from, I am asking now for you guys\gals out there given this task what would you do to try and overcome this problem?

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14170 02/02/08 02:36 PM
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Jim Rogers Online Confused
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I've been making commander heads since 2000, and there doesn't seem to be any solution other than keeping a stack of timber drop offs on hand to make more. And taking several extra heads ready for use to a raising.
My commander heads have been made out of eastern white pine, spruce, and hemlock. Some have split more than others.
I took one set of commanders to at guild raising where they told me that they were glad to see me as they had split and broken four commanders the day before I got there assembling the bents.
My job that day was to work with Dave Carlon and his crew adjusting and plumbing the post of this barn. Each post was 12"x12"x20' and they had to be moved to the correct distance from the outside gable was as well as the correct distance from the side wall.
I swung that commander all day long moving 4 post per bent in a seven bent barn. And never broke the head on it.
The very next weekend I took that same commander to a well know timber framing school to be used to raise the class frame and a student broke the head of the handle with the first three swings.
I believe it was due to operator error. He didn't understand that the end face of the commander has to strike the object timber flat. I think he hit it on a corner of the head.
I make my commander handles out of red oak, and have had the same handle for 8 years......
I have never suggested that anyone use a ring as I feel it will eventually fall off during use and that it could damage the timbers being assembled during a raising.... But that's just my opinion about rings....

Jim Rogers


Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Jim Rogers] #14193 02/05/08 01:12 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Thanks Jim:

That is very interesting, and it is nice to know that others are experiencing the similar problem that I seemed to experienced in the muley mill.

I also kept spare commander heads ready to be employed as the need arose.

The one wood that I had the best luck with was wild apple wood that was well dried and cured, and that had grown in a thicket where it had to fight for its life.

The old timers told me that Rock elm was a favorite if it could be had. Around here the specae disappeared with the dutch elm disease about 40 years ago.

anyway thanks for the info maybe someone will make use of our experiences,

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14256 02/11/08 12:59 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi to those on this thread:

Once again just alittle off topic but a very interesting question I believe, and one that i would like help with:

I have a well seasoned red oak timber 12" square that I would like to cut up in 1.25" boards, without any more bowing than can possibly be tolerated. I would like to not cut boards any less than 4" in width due to the project at hand.

I do not profess to be an expert in this regard, but I know that there is many out there that are.

what would a proper proceedure of cutting be to work around any internal stresses in this regard?

thanks in advance


NH

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