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Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: TIMBEAL] #14790 03/28/08 12:30 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Thanks Tim:

We will give this a few days before I reveal what the exact cost was at that time. I like that .29Cents, but then again I am sure that 1 cent bought a fair amount, probably a half litre of kerosine,

Maybe a few more would like to risk a guess.

What about the pitch of the roof why do you think that particular pitch was asked for?

here is a few more information tidbits to base your guess on or to just read about--

-There were 6 windows with 12 lights each
-the floor was 2 thicknesses of g&t lumber hemlock and pine
-Planking was 2" Hemlock planks 12 feet long and all over 8" in width and each nailed with 3-- 6" wrought iron spikes.
-one roof ventilator
-Hemlock roof boarding
-roofing good sound cedar shingles #1, laid at 5" to the weather
-10 feet between floor and ceiling

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: TIMBEAL] #14791 03/28/08 01:07 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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hee is a photo of the Schwerdfeger driveshed discussed above

NH

Last edited by northern hewer; 03/28/08 01:09 AM.
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14792 03/28/08 01:11 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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I just thought that I would try and download a picture to keep my skills going, I actually amazed myself that I was able to do it.

Enjoy

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14795 03/28/08 10:36 AM
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OK, maybe I am a bit high on the quote. Tim

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: TIMBEAL] #14806 03/29/08 12:19 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi Tim:

I am not giving you any hints, the next time I am on I will reveal the true price in 1877 dollars,

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14808 03/29/08 12:21 AM
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Canadian dollars?

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Gabel] #14809 03/29/08 12:37 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi Gabel


Thanks for coming on stream, looking forward to your response-

"in Canadian Dollars"

I expect so because the construction was here in Ontario.

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14811 03/29/08 12:43 AM
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Last edited by northern hewer; 03/29/08 12:44 AM.
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14812 03/29/08 01:03 AM
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Hi everyone:


This is the outcome of a surprise find in the attic of an 1865 church that I happened to visit to film the timber trusses that suspended the ceiling.

This truss did not have the metal repairs on it when I first viewed it. The timber as found was nearly rotted through, and had started to drop about 1.5 inches.

This timber by the way was in length, a 12" by 14" by 45' bottom chord that not only suspended the ceiling , but supported about 50% of the weight of the spire of the church.

You can see if you look closely where there had been a chimney at one time right beside the end of the truss, and I suspect leakage from the flashing had allowed the rot to happen.

The repairs as you see them were ordered by an engineer, and have pressure rings next to the steel to help with the tension on the timber. Also there is a new piece of timber that replaces the rotted section, which was about 6 feet long. Most of the rot happened where the brace from the vertical post (out of sight) met the horizontal chord.

This is just another of the many things that I have run across during my forays to gain information on the many facets of timberframing.

This truss by the way was a bridge truss, very strong construction all the parts other than the horizontal chord was hard wood (oak), and the vertical oak posts were mortised into the 45 foot horizontals with a half dovetail and wedges driven from underneath.

the other trusses seemed like new and were amazing to see and photograph.

enjoy

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #14819 03/29/08 10:54 AM
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NH, do you recall if the half dovetails had pull apart some or were they still tight?

In 1877 the US had just come out of the Civil War by a few years and Canada/England may of had a better economy? My price is in US dollars so you will need the exchange rate for that time. I did factor that all in, didn't I. Tim

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