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Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: TIMBEAL] #17887 01/31/09 01:10 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi JIm and tim

Jim if you look back on this site you will see some pics of a couple of the raisings that we did at UCV using a gin to assist in the raising.

Hope you enjoy

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: TIMBEAL] #17900 01/31/09 03:00 PM
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OurBarns1 Offline
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Originally Posted By: TIMBEAL
I would like to see a universal pivit for the bottom allowing the pole to be tilted in any direction and still be anchored down well.(a universal joint from a large trucks drive line).

Tim


Tim:

Sounds like a universal pivot on the end of a pole is a great idea. A truck's u-joint, like you say, is one option. And I bet some sort of "ball and socket" configuration is possible too... maybe a large trailer hitch ball set into something, or a pintle hitch set-up.

Yankee ingenuity grin

Last edited by OurBarns1; 01/31/09 03:01 PM.

Don Perkins
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to know the trees...


Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: OurBarns1] #17907 01/31/09 07:59 PM
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Emmett Greenleaf Offline
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an articulated gin pole/derrick. already been done. used a lot by the VMI cadets on their annual project(s). see pictures from the Ferry Farm Project. Designed for quick up/down with line storage in galv garbage cans. Base is also a skid block. Maybe we could entice Grigg Mullen to publish some drawings.

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Emmett Greenleaf] #17911 01/31/09 11:02 PM
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Will Truax Offline
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NH –

I too, am fond of manpower, though I‘m not much for pikes or lifts without an assist from some mechanical advantage. With even multipart tackle we’re still in simple machine territory, not much to break down.

Not only is it always big fun to raise this way, sometimes it is just the right tool for the job.

I’ve shared the same story as Tim, literally gotten work because the other framers the client called first weren’t interested in raising on some out of the way inaccessible site, without a crane.

And in this instance, a frame I raised (with the help of many – a workshop cut frame) back in ‘ 01 at the New Hampshire Farm Museum it really was the best tool in the box.

Necessarily a piece on piece raising, it took two full days to assemble.(a long time for a scribed frame) Though the use of the derrick was to add interest to the workshop, it also was a little cheaper than raising with a crane and safer and allowed for far greater control than swinging pieces with the telehandler.

One person to lift each stick, and somebody behind them to tail the rope, one person to turn the mast and luff the spar, and two monkeys on the frame to seat either end of each stick.



Here we are removing the spar, and about to swing the derrick mast out from the center of the frame, and then swing the cubidle up into place (Yes a tree service crane was there for fortyfive minutes – no half day rate though, they volunteered to the museum)



The heart of the derrick was a set of castings (a base plate and box to ride it and the guy line ring and swivel and the fittings to fit the end of the spar and mast) which used make their living at one of the states many granite quarries, and are part of the collection at the museum. The raised spar (raised to put it above the frames roof system) is not traditional, and called for a nontraditional mast, a forty foot length of schedule 80 6” thickwall pipe and a little welding and fab.

And is it just me ? Does this thread not drive everyone batty ? Can’t the offending oversized photograph be re-sized or deleted ?




"We build too many walls and not enough bridges" - Isaac Newton

http://bridgewright.wordpress.com/

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Will Truax] #17912 01/31/09 11:11 PM
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Jim Rogers Offline
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Originally Posted By: Will Truax

Can’t the offending oversized photograph be re-sized or deleted ?


Only the moderator can do that.....


Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Jim Rogers] #17914 01/31/09 11:20 PM
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Will Truax Offline
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Um ya, or the person who put it up.

Not wondering who can do it, just asking that it might be considered.


"We build too many walls and not enough bridges" - Isaac Newton

http://bridgewright.wordpress.com/

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Will Truax] #17918 02/01/09 12:32 AM
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Jim Rogers Offline
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Can you edit any of your previous posts?
I can't edit mine....

So again, only the moderator can do it....

It seems that the time for editing is very short.....again.....



Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Will Truax] #17919 02/01/09 01:23 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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HI everyone:


thanks for all the input and pics, you never know what might come out of a subject but this has really been a good run, and I am sure educational for everyone stopping in.

One thing that I have always been pondering over the years was how the builders from old hoisted up into place the 45 foot stack on the steam engine at UCV, now we used a crane when we restored it in '84

There was a good 1870 photograph of the stack lying on an incline with its top resting on the roof of the steam engine house when it was being installed at that time it was from this photograph that we were able to reconstruct the stack faithfully to its original design

This stack was quite heavy I would say probably about 2000 lbs
It had to be lifted up in a vertical position, above the roof of the steam engine house and gently lowered down onto the top of the boiler,that was already installed and waiting for the stack to be positioned.

In my mind this is the proceedure that I believe they used:

-utilizing a 40 foot gin pole, and grasped the stack slightly above the centre line. The lift began with ropes and cables attached

The stack was hoisted to the approximate height of 35 feet from the ground level. At this time the stack was gently stood upright the bottom approx 15 feet from the ground using mooring ropes attached to the bottom.

The gin and the vertical stack was then slowly positined over the opening in the roof and lowered carefully down into its final resting position on top of the boiler.

Final tethering of the stack then took place to complete the installation

I invite comments on this proceedure as it is only my idea just how this might have been done at that time we had no information about the installation just the photograph of the new stack ready for installation.

As I said I have pondered many times how this was done I am now inviting comments from you guys and maybe a few engineers out there who might be looking in.

Thanks again for stopping by

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #17937 02/02/09 01:07 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi everyone looking in tonight:

Just a a further note to my posting last night, we also had in our collection a lovely painting of the mill along with the steam engine shed\house and the stack in place, secured with its guy lines 2 to the peak of the mill, and 2 in opposing directions I suspect to individual mooring probably 2 deadmen strategically located for that purpose.


The mill was gutted by a fire a few years after the painting was done very likely set by an overheated bearing in the husking frame, by the way does anyone know what the husking frame is and what its purpose is in relation to the milling equipment.


There are a quite a few people stopping by the site please feel free to join in and don't be shy.


For another guessing question in relation to the mill what horsepower do you think would be needed to operate the mill, its many elevators, shellers, 3 runs of stones and the bolter.


NH

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #18017 02/06/09 01:24 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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HI everyone:

It looks like no one wants to take a stab at a definition for :

Husking Frame:

The Husking frame in a grist mill is a very sturdy framework of timbers that suspend and hold very true the bed stones and their runners along with the spindles and located directly underneath is the turbine or driving power.

IN our mill the 4" vertical shaft that rises from the pressure pit where the turbine is located, extends upwards for 3 stories right up to the attic area, where it is then directed horizontally using gearing meant for that purpose and which is aattached to the horizontal shafting that in turn powers all sorts of equipment.

As the 4" shaft passes through the husking frame wooden pulleys are attached to it which power each of the 3 runs of stones using 12" pure leather belting.

This husking frame is completely independant of the mill structure especially if it is has stone walls, the reason being that the vibration that is generated during the grinding process would eventually destroy the very rigid walls.

The husking frame usually stands on a foundation that is also independant of the mill wall foundation, and is usually constructed using white oak timbers

Hope you enjoy

NH

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