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Chainsaw Lathe #20467 06/25/09 02:08 AM
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generatorblue Offline OP
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Hello!

A lathe is usually a tool that is larger than the piece of metal or wood that it is shaping. By using a chainsaw to spin and cut and shape a column, I am opening a new field of application for that tool. It is clear to me that columns with attractive contours were installed in older houses and have been replaced by rectangular prisms because the carpenter have now way to make to duplicate the original design.

With additional attachment that would allow the chainsaw to follow the contour of the original design, a 100 pounds of equipment could soon be doing the work of a lathe that weights two tons.


15 years ago, I copied the contour of a column with a chainsaw. Recently I needed a replacement column and had to make one with a chainsaw again. I tried to find out if anyone else had a video clip depicting the use of a chainsaw as a lathe, and found nothing similar. This explains why I think that this video clip could make chainsaw history:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdxtPu5MkIY&feature=channel



I would appreciate a rating from people who know about chainsaws. If you plan to add control to it, I could help

Thank you and have a good day!

P R Paul



Note:

As usual I try to give additional information in the "info" section of the video clip. But, without someone else doing the filming, I could only show the very basic setup for this mechanical improvisation. However, the scary part is that the whole thing can spin out of control if the chainsaw is kept straight and pressure is applied. The faster you spin the less you cut. In order to cut efficiently, the blade has to intermittently make contact with the wood at an angle. Friction resistance can be introduced at a point that has already been made round. By example under that piece of wood that is holding the bucket of water, a piece of sandpaper could be glued to make contact with the spinning beam (a plastic gallon of water with a cap would be better than an open bucket, in order to control the contact pressure). As a matter of fact, you could even have two chainsaws working on the same beam. The stronger chainsaw will have the spinning start in one direction while the smaller weaker chainsaw (or rotary sander) would cut in the opposite direction and create some drag that will make the larger chainsaw cut efficiently. It could be a completely wild thing. But, It can also be setup in a factory setting with precision pantograph type guidance.




Re: Chainsaw Lathe [Re: generatorblue] #20470 06/25/09 10:42 AM
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TIMBEAL Offline
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generatorblue, what did you use to turn the post while finishing? Do you have footage of the finishing? Maybe a discription.

I don't get to watch Andy Rooney, even for two minutes.

Tim


Re: Chainsaw Lathe [Re: TIMBEAL] #20502 06/28/09 01:50 AM
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Gen.blue.
Welcome.
Looks like you've been having FUN! Awesome turbines bud!
I'm not so sure about the lathe,, but will keep looking!
dave

Re: Chainsaw Lathe [Re: collarandhames] #20505 06/28/09 10:19 AM
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I hope he pops back to clarify the finishing detail. This could be a reasonable solution to such posts, the video does leave me wondering.

Tim

Re: Chainsaw Lathe [Re: TIMBEAL] #20568 07/05/09 03:17 AM
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I hope he stops back in too. Ingenuity is a great thing. There has to be a spokeshave in there somewhere.

Re: Chainsaw Lathe [Re: TIMBEAL] #21080 09/03/09 02:46 PM
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Hi Tim!

I used a (8 amps) sander polisher. If the tool rotates, you just give the beam a first spin and then make contact with the rotating sanding pad. The finishing is a piece of cake and takes no time at all. The sculpting takes time. At times, I not only attached the beam at one end, but while it is tied up, I wedged a piece of wood to add tension to the rope. You can find a more efficient way to keep the beam from moving when you want to glide the chainsaw from top to bottom. But, since I only make one of those every five years, and did not record the 3 previous times, I can only remember all the tricks that I used if people ask specific questions like the one you asked.

I added a 1-minute video clip entitled "Setup for chainsaw Lathe" 3 weeks ago. This last video clip should have been at the beginning of the long one, but I have not mastered my video editor and do not have a cameraperson.

I was sure that people like you could fill in the blanks.
I thank you for asking. For faster response (I check youtube twice a week)you can contact me by clicking on the "generatorblue" name on YOUTUBE. one of the optiopns will let you send mail to me. This is different from entering a comment. The comment is made public but the mail is private.

Tim, I thank you for asking.
PRPaul

Re: Chainsaw Lathe [Re: collarandhames] #21081 09/03/09 02:55 PM
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Thank you Dave!

You are right, I rather be making windmills. However, so far my windmills are not up to practical scale. I just wanted to show that I also make things that last. I think that you should use watch the "Setup for chainsaw Lathe video clip as well"

Note: as long as the beam is moving, there is no chance for the chain to be trapped and therefore trigger a kickback. Since I am not using the tip of the bar either, there is no problem. Speed control and making sure that you do not cut too deep is what it is about. I gave you the basic setup. You can read more in the "info" section of the video clip. There is a lot of room for improvement with all kinds of attachment, but it all started twelve years ago when I shaped my first column. I was smarter then!

Thank you for your response.
PRPaul

Re: Chainsaw Lathe [Re: TIMBEAL] #21083 09/03/09 03:05 PM
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Hi Tim!

I have copied a section of my response to another member in the hope that this bring some clarity. The question was about finishing the surface of the pole:

I used a (8 amps) sander polisher. If the tool rotates, you just give the beam a first spin and then make contact with the rotating sanding pad. The finishing is a piece of cake and takes no time at all. The sculpting takes time. At times, I not only attached the beam at one end, but while it was tied up, I wedged a piece of wood to add tension to the rope. You can find a more efficient way to keep the beam from moving when you want to glide the chainsaw from top to bottom. But, since I only make one of those every five years, and did not record the 3 previous times, I can only remember all the tricks that I used if people ask specific questions like the one you asked.

I added a 1-minute video clip entitled "Setup for chainsaw Lathe" 3 weeks ago. This last video clip should have been at the beginning of the long one.

I hope that this helps.
Thank you, PRPaul

Re: Chainsaw Lathe [Re: mo] #21084 09/03/09 03:11 PM
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MO,
I copied a section of my response to another member in the hope that this brings some clarity. The question was about finishing the surface of the pole:

I used a (8 amps) sander polisher. If the tool rotates, you just give the beam a first spin and then make contact with the rotating sanding pad. The finishing is a piece of cake and takes no time at all. The sculpting takes time. At times, I not only attached the beam at one end, but while it was tied up, I wedged a piece of wood to add tension to the rope. You can find a more efficient way to keep the beam from moving when you want to glide the chainsaw from top to bottom. But, since I only make one of those every five years, and did not record the 3 previous times, I can only remember all the tricks that I used if people ask specific questions like the one you asked.

I added a 1-minute video clip entitled "Setup for chainsaw Lathe" 3 weeks ago. This last video clip should have been at the beginning of the long one.

Thanks PRPaul

Re: Chainsaw Lathe [Re: generatorblue] #21098 09/04/09 10:53 AM
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I have no need yet of round stock such as this but if it comes up I will play with this as a possibility. I do see nicely done porches with odd square posts replacing the turned ones, too bad someone hadn't taken the time to go the extra steps. Thanks for the creativity.

Tim

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