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Re: historic hewing questionnaire #25719 03/01/11 01:06 AM
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D L Bahler Offline
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what procedure did you use NH? sounds like a tricky one.

One possible solution is to cut a block with an angled side to match the carriage sides, so that when placed against the timbers the sides of the blocks would be parallel (I don't know how clear my description is?) These blocks could be held in place opposite each other, and would give you parallel reference faces for the purposes of marking and drilling. Then when you do drill, just go through both the block and the frame.


Was de eine ilüchtet isch für angeri villech nid so klar.
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Re: historic hewing questionnaire #25756 03/03/11 12:57 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi everyone tonight;

Thanks for jumping in DL and a good starting point.

As you go for (hopefully) the right proceedure remember that you have only one try and spoiling the processed timber is not an option

DL I take it that you are suggesting going from the outside surface on one side and then progressing toward the other side, that would be a distance of 36" , do you think that you would exit where you want to or just hoping?

Remember also that the 1" threaded rod will not bend even a little bit so the hole has to be straight and true from side to side

I am not ready to share the proceedure I took yet I need some more solutions to come in first, so lets have some more input from you guys,

Thanks in advance

Have fun and learn

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire #25758 03/03/11 02:31 AM
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D L Bahler Offline
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My thought was to drill each side independently by carefully marking the positioning of the holes, and using the blocks to ensure the drill goes in at the proper angle


Was de eine ilüchtet isch für angeri villech nid so klar.
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Re: historic hewing questionnaire #25846 03/09/11 02:58 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonight

Well it doesn't look like anyone else is going to put their views forward on how they would tackle this drilling problem and as I said just using ordinary tools nothing special

How I did it was to use a slightly larger auger to allow for some error, and I drilled from the inside outward using the channel in the spanner as a guide for the drill, this seemed to work well for me.

Thanks for coming on board

enjoy and learn

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire #25848 03/09/11 08:42 AM
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Ken Hume Offline
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Hi Richard,

I have keenly been awaiting some answers on how this would be achieved but confess that I don't quite follow your explanation - a little sketch might help.

Ken Hume


Looking back to see the way ahead !
Re: historic hewing questionnaire #25857 03/10/11 01:54 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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hello everyone tonight

Ken I am not much good at posting sketches but with a little imagination I will try our best to clarify

The sides run at angles separated by a 6" spanner, I noted that the !" bolt will run in a channel located in the spanner.

I decided to use the channel as a guide for boring the holes through the exterior vertical timber walls

Knowing perfectly well that there could be some error I decided to use a slightly larger diameter auger, and a good thing I did because the ship augers are famous for not boring really straight, at least that is my observations from experience

The auger did wander a bit even after carefully lining up , and carefully sharpening before I used it.

I hope this helps

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire #25868 03/12/11 03:13 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hi everyone tonight

Thanks for coming on board and those that are visiting the site

I had one last problem to overcome in shaping the various pieces for the garrison carriages, I had to put rounded axles on the ends of the fairly large timbers to accomodate the cannon wheels

The timbers were 10 by 12" white oak, and the rounded portions were 13" long 5" in diameter.

Of course I had no large lathe, just my experience and ingenuity to accomlish the task. Keep n mind that the wheels only had to slide on snuggly!

Now for the sake of those that want to learn lets hear some ways that you might take to go ahead with this problem

Have fun

Learn

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire #25931 03/18/11 01:38 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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hello everyone tonight

There doesn't seem to me to be any one venturing a method to get this job done so lets go a different direction--

I am asking anyone and everyone to rate this job on a scale of 1 to 10 in degrees of difficulty

I am trying to make this a learning experience so lets get going

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire #25939 03/18/11 06:33 PM
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D L Bahler Offline
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I am afraid I don't quite understand the scenario, and perhaps I am not the only one? Maybe with a bit more clarification and perhaps some illustrations some of us might be more willing to hazard a guess?

thanks

DLB


Was de eine ilüchtet isch für angeri villech nid so klar.
http://riegelbau.wordpress.com/
Re: historic hewing questionnaire #25940 03/19/11 01:26 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonight

Thanks for coming on board DL

Maybe I am naieve but I really didn't think that putting rounded axles on the ends of large timbers was too hard to comprehend, I tried to explain it as best I could sorry if I did not come across clear enough

I guess that over the years I have come to marvel at the workmanship of our forefathers, taking forgranted that they accomplished many complicated projects without the use of electricity and power tools

I Put this quiz out to test the ingenuity of this site's followers, to see what solutions to accomplish this task they would use if it was put in their hands to carry out

I have not said no power tools but just basic tools, and I might add historic tools if one has them and can use them.

So having hopefully clarified things a bit lets again try to get some methods to go ahead with this project

|Have fun learn

NH



Last edited by northern hewer; 03/19/11 01:27 AM.
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