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Re: historic hewing questionnaire #27444 10/21/11 12:23 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonight:

Yes Don that is exactly like the braces that I described earlier and has been labeled as diminished haunches.

Thanks for posting

I really cannot think of a reason for forming this type of framing detail, in my opinion it is alot more work to create and for what end?

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire #27453 10/21/11 10:51 PM
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TIMBEAL Offline
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Don, is that a magical shaman from the northern hinder lands painted on the post?

NH, I don't typically use a haunch on brace work. But I do find a haunch for the housing easier to cut as Dave points out. The aspect I like is the grain is sloping the right direction. No squirrelly grain to deal with, null and void, as is possible with square housings. I call it "pat the cat", pat most cats the wrong way and they get irritated.

Well, the grain isn't sloping but the cut in relation to the grain allows you to shave nice smooth cuts.

Is this page/thread getting too long? It is always weird to load.

Re: historic hewing questionnaire #27455 10/22/11 12:01 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonight

thanks for coming on board Timbeal and the comments on the point in question, and now I am going to ask another favour:

Could you or Dave explain to me your proceedure for cutting the diminished haunch angle, I suspect that you would do the braces first and then the matching angle on the post or beam, or visa versa.

When we were reconstructing the Barn at UCV we did the braces and then fitted the brace's feet to the sides of the post or beam what ever the case may be, until everything was square, it seemed to be quite a bit of extra work.

We were using 4 by 6" hewn white ash copying the size of the originals

NH

Last edited by northern hewer; 10/22/11 12:04 AM.
Re: historic hewing questionnaire #27456 10/22/11 07:50 AM
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Cecile en Don Wa Offline
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Hello,

Timbeal, there are so many possible responses to your speculations given the relation of the projecting brace to the shadowy figure, but I'm not even going to go there. I will state though that from now on I will not be able to go to that corner of the barn with a neutral mind-set.

Regarding the joinery, to me this is a completely standard, logical and even visually pleasing joint in its entirety. And as the question by Richard was a pointed one, I'll just add for now that in the way I have learned to cut it, all the lay-out is done prior to any cuts being made.

Greetings,

Don Wagstaff

Last edited by Cecile en Don Wa; 10/22/11 07:52 AM.
Re: historic hewing questionnaire #27458 10/22/11 09:47 AM
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TIMBEAL Offline
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Don, truly at first I thought it was a picture of the famous amanita mushroom collector, but after closer speculation it reminded me of something I had seen in my grandfathers shed, the place where he cleaned his paint brushed.

Richard, the joint can be cut very easily via square rule, one solution. No mystery, with the exception of Dons picture.

Last edited by TIMBEAL; 10/22/11 09:48 AM.
Re: historic hewing questionnaire #27464 10/23/11 12:10 AM
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Will Truax Offline
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NH - I'm a bit puzzled as to how these represent extra work, no harder to layout and particularly easy to cut with hand tools, the bulk of the waste removable with a small side ax.


"We build too many walls and not enough bridges" - Isaac Newton

http://bridgewright.wordpress.com/

Re: historic hewing questionnaire #27466 10/23/11 01:39 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Good evening everyone

Well thanks for all the varying explanations, I guess that our experiences probably are a result of never having came across or seen a diminished haunch that is until I examined the barn we reproduced, and then had to reproduce it.

From what I can make out there seems to be some fitting that would need to be done at some point during the fitting up of the frame.

I really was wondering if we were following the only proceedure as I explained above or if one could prefabricate the braces ahead of time, like one can the regular cut braces that follow the framing lines

I must say that I am a bit puzzled yet as far as why one would use a diminished haunch

In my opinion the regular braces would allow more freedom for movement off the frame in very high winds, it seems to me that the dimished haunch's very tight fit along the haunch would place an exceptional amount of strain on the side of the brace, rather that being a compression strain only

I wonder what an engineer might think about this reasoning.

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #27781 12/14/11 01:00 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Well Hello everyone tonight

Sorry to have been away for so long, but I was having password problems--finally got the kinks worked out thanks to Joel Mcarty, my hat goes off to you Joel, thanks for keeping at it.

I was just noticing my last post was in October, and I am sure glad to be back on board again.

I have some really good topics coming up so please come back and visit.

Well merry Christmas to everyone, or happy Holidays what ever fits--

As always

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #27791 12/16/11 02:24 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonight

Well great weather here, usually -20F but tonight +50F

Years ago my dad and I would be starting out for the bush to ready the sleighing roads, and cutting ones into new territory

getting the sleigh out hitching up the team and pulling it a few miles on the gravel road to shine up the steel runners, a real must before trying to haul heavy loads through the snow

next getting out the axes, the crosscut saw, the steel wedges, the logging chains, and lastly the peevee, or canthook.

There is nothing better than entering the bush road on a coating of fresh snow, coming upon a group of white tailed deer, and a few wild turkeys, standing out black on the white snow

our agenda would be 40 cords of firewood, 100 cedar posts, and the usual 2 to 3 thousand bd feet of logs

In 1942- my father left to work on the Alaska Highway construction--The reason being to earn enough to construct a new barn. He was gone for 2 years, and when he returned my mother didn't even recognize him when he stepped off the train at the Morrisburg station. His return of course meant that he was in charge as head of the household, a role my mother had held for 2 years, what a change!

In winter of 1944 he along with my uncle cut 22 thousand Bd Ft of logs just with axes and the crosscut saw, along with the usual 40 cords of firewood and fence posts. On our property that meant that everything was removed from the bush lot that would square 4 inches

The nails were hard to get due to the war going on at that time, but we were able to get 2 kegs of square cut nails, and some aluminum nails which came out at that time

By that fall a new barn stood out against the skyline, and I stood in front of it with my duck, I was 5 years old,

I am looking over now at the same barn 70 years later, the same 6 light wood sash in place still in good order, it appears like they will last for another 40 to 50 years. I remember quite well playing in the putty as my father glazed the windows on the table of the old house, in the light of a coal oil lantern

I was just getting ready to start my schooling at SS#10 a one room school up the road that taught all 8 grades in the open room.


Well I hope you enjoy a little look back in time, this seems to be a time for remembrances of years and christmas's gone by

Does anyone like to add their touch I SURE would like to hear your story

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #27793 12/16/11 09:47 PM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Well hello everyone tonight

Continuing with my remenicents above, I had the opportunity in life to experience and live the hardtimes first hand, in doing so though I learned and was taught some of the basic requirements to survive without much--one thing that we had though was a close family relationship, we pulled together to get through the seemingly endless cold nights, cut off from the outside world for weeks at a time

Hewing timber for a new addition ( a woodshed) took place during these days, I remember going with my dad and picking out the straightest logs, and then watching with wonder as he seemingly worked slowly and methodically with what seemed to me to be a very large axe to square up the framing timbers

These remembrances came back to me as my life unfolded and I had the opportunity to show those that wanted to learn the old craft, as I knew it,--a great feeling--

Father liked to reminise about the days gone by, and some of the old bush stories really got my attention, like the one he told about the horse they had that drew out the logs without any supervision, "just hitched him up and let him go, he loved it" . Hewing railway ties for the railroad construction was another story of course going back another generation to my grandfather's time

These oldtimers were real men--lived for the winter and bush work--and for their horses--loved them with a passion--

Well got to go

hope you enjoy

NH

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