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Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Jay White Cloud] #30429 03/20/13 04:52 PM
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D Wagstaff Offline
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Hello,

It's a funny thing but the last time I have been on the look out for some more information about a sharpening stone I picked up last summer, a natural sandstone called an Orsas. I read the account of someone visiting the mines which noted all the men 60 years and above were dead and only old women were still left. It was silicosis, or something, from the particles of sandstone dust lodging in their lungs. Not that that's funny, you understand.

Greetings,

Don Wagstaff

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: D Wagstaff] #30430 03/20/13 05:32 PM
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Jay White Cloud Offline
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Good Day All,

Silicosis was (is) the bane of all stone carvers, quarry workers and many in the stone industry. The life expectancy of most folks in the trade, (including some of my family,) was less than 50 and most died between 35 and 45. It has gotten better of course with ventilation and mask technology but is still a concern when you do it every day.

The "stone sheds," are what killed many of the workers in all of the stone trade, from architectural to the industrial stone work, (like sharpening stones and wheels.) The small quarries had there own carvers, but they worked outside most of the time and didn't get the concentrated dust you did in "stone sheds." One of my teacher, Floyd was 90 years old when we went back to an old quarry in Arkansas to collect a Blank to make a wheel he wanted. These old quarries are still scattered around all over the place, if you know where to look. The still operate in the Middle East and throughout Asia.

Regards,

jay

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: Jay White Cloud] #30434 03/21/13 01:57 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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hello everyone tonight

Thanks for coming in on this discussion--The dust problem and what could be an ensuing lung disease by all means needs to be addressed, and thanks for bringing it up---

You know--the old millers especially grist millers eat their share of flour dust, and the stone sharpening was quite dangerous because of splinters flying from their mill picks, many had injuries to their eyes--

There are many dangers in the old trades, even in the women's trades, people mostly women who dyed their wool in many chemical concoctions had no idea what they were breathing into their lungs

I became very aware of dangers airborne and otherwise due to compulsory WHMIS training a number of years ago, and since then many new regulations are continuing to come out to keep the environment safe--it sure needs attention--

Now once again I am straying away from the topic--just need to get my grindstone trued up safely, which with all your help and suggestions will come to a sucessful conclusions--going to advance steadily in that direction, it certainly will be a great addition to my workshop --(our) workshop, everyone uses it, even the neighbours mainly because it is roomy and heated, and I might add contains most of the (sharp) tools needed for most projects--some of the projects require getting out a hand powered tool once in a while--

just lately I was restoring the Casselman Hand Sleigh with the naturally curved runners and needed to use a spoke shave to shape the inside curves and edges what a wonderful tool--anyway while I was working away in Came my Grandaughter's husband Nick , I showed him what I was doing and asked him if he would like to try his hand, well I am going to tell you he became an avid fan of hand tools right there

No other tool would put that particular finish on the surface of the wood runners--I finished up with a piece of broken glass another great finish--just try it and see for yourself--

enjoy

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #30436 03/21/13 07:53 AM
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D Wagstaff Offline
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Hello,

You want to take us on a (virtual) tour of your workshop then NH? I can't wait. But at least, I'm wondering how you are heating the workshop. Sounds real pleasant.

The right shard for the right shape helps get rid of that factory coating that should never have been there in the first place.



Don Wagstaff

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: D Wagstaff] #30444 03/23/13 01:24 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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hello everyone tonight

Hello Don and others looking in

Don--I heat with an oil furnace--works good for me--but a real pain to please the insurance and oil co. reps. finally did though with perseverence--

I have over the last couple of years posted some pictures in past posts, maybe you can find them by looking back

Thanksfor joining in

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #30492 04/07/13 01:19 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #30493 04/07/13 01:56 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonight

Well here I am sitting on a partially finished 24 footer early one morning--getting ready for the day ahead--many will be stopping by families, oldtimers, and many very knowledeable people like yourselves

We were working on the 3 bay driveshed, part of the collection of outstructures connected with the newly reconstructed gristmill at UCV

this was a full 1 years project starting with the selection of a structure resembling the original driveshed, long disappeared, but found by chance in an old painting, what a find that was--

The surviving driveshed was then located on a property belonging to the Colquhoun family --what a feeling to see this old structure and realize that in 12 months its replica would be standing straight and true--

There is more to this story

enjoy

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #30513 04/09/13 11:48 PM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonight

Here is another view of the timber rolled up ready for hewing--I thought you might enjoy a birds eye view of the set up--this is the way we presented our on site historic reconstruction actually doing the work as historically correct as possible using only period tools

This 3 bay driveshed took 1 year from start to finish and was viewed by thousands of families as they passed by

enjoy

NH



Last edited by northern hewer; 04/09/13 11:54 PM.
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #30533 04/13/13 12:53 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonight

Well its nice to get back to some of the basics of timberframing, without the hewn material nothing would have gotten done for sure--

As I look at the above pictures many feelings of emotion come to life, the smell of the white pine, the methodical sound of the axes biting into the wood, the wide eyed children and their parents passing by, the men who have strayed away from their wives to take in and mavel at the slow emerging square timber from the round baulks.

From time to time I talk about how we set up our timbers for hewing, we always kept timbers close to the ground and well anchored with the hand made timber dogs--they were not fancy just round iron bars bent and pointed, we had three different lengths in set of three to accomodate small and larger timbers

As you look at the last picture that I posted you can visualize I am sure how much heavier the timber side to be hewn is than the opposite side which has already been squared up.

The hewing process creates a fair amount of vibration and without proper stability can become hazardous if it happens to work loose, the timber rolling in the direction of the hewer who would have been standing close beside the log

enjoy

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #30536 04/14/13 12:24 AM
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Dave Shepard Offline
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I enjoy your posts NH. Thanks.


Member, Timber Framers Guild
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