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Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #33240 11/03/15 04:03 PM
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Jay White Cloud Offline
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Lofting

This topic has a broad history, and much of it out of context and in other cultures as well...but with similar applications. Even "wiki" does a decent job with outlining and/or defining it.

Tim B. gave a good basic run at its Etymology and it does have many meanings from a term in golf to a space in architecture.

In the "design-build" world it goes back millenia and is part of the entire world of "scribing modalities." Its origin in most likely first employed in sculpture and then in boat building. Its use in sculpture, such as stone gives it and other "3D" methods of transferring and transcribing datum from a "flat plane" into a three dimensional plan. There are countless ways of doing this, and again it is found in many cultures (Roman, Greek, Egyptian, Asian.)

It can be performed off a "lofting floor" but is not limited to this method at all. There are methods that can use walls and even the ceiling. These "flat planes" become the "grid plane" and then in the visual space surrounding it we form a 3D context of what is to be constructed...a boat, a plan, a timber frame or perhaps the orgin purpose a figure or object to be sculpted.

Armature methods are part of this data transfer as well but that takes this more into the world of sculpture (but applicable) than its context to timber framing...

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #33241 11/03/15 04:32 PM
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D Wagstaff Offline
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Oh, actually I was mistaken Jay, taking "lofting" as "lafting". Spoken they might sound similar because you don't got that hard "a" so much over here. Anyway, just a bunch of confusion, sorry about that.

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #33242 11/03/15 04:59 PM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonight

Jay and Jim--thanks for your comments--

What I am wondering also is there anyone looking in that might be considering historical mill reconstruction, or should I be posting in other domains?

I really like it here, and I have a real gut feeling that many like yourselves enjoy dropping by

Just to carry on a bit with my topic the bearing that connects to the offset crank on the "Rose Wheel" or what I refer to as a "horizontal Barrel wheel" is quite a complicated wooden split bearing, it is adjustable as it wears, is water lubricated, and can withstand vibration and stress if it is well constructed

I have to go right now but will be back to expand the topic's technical features

Enjoy

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #33243 11/03/15 06:02 PM
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Hi NH,

I am not sure if you are active on "LinkedIn."

I suggest/recommend to many working in a professional capacity within the "Historic Restoration" and related artisan/professional trades to join the different "groups" that are available to professionals in their field within LinkedIn. Some are "open" while others are "closed" and request a "submission" for entry. These groups have among their memberships a global network of museums, historical societies, NGO, governmental and related organization like UNESCO that share information on all manner of related topic. Some of it "timber framing" and the topic of "vintage tool markings" has come up over the past few years as it pertains to kerfing, planning, hewing and related tool marks.

I think much of what you share would be of interest there as well.

Warm Regards,

j

Last edited by Jay White Cloud; 11/03/15 06:02 PM.
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #33244 11/03/15 06:19 PM
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Please continue, Richard. My grandfather had a big commercial cider press, it had wooden screw threads. Nothing like you are talking about, but the whole concept of wooden pieces of machinery fascinates me. I never got to see grandpa's press, no more than I will ever be able to see your mill. But I see them both in my mind's eye as I hear them described.

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #33245 11/04/15 07:58 PM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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hello everyone tonight

Well the bottom bearing---where will I start---

The pitmnan at this point is 4" thick and 6" wide--this seems to be stout enough, but we have to insert a wooden bearing which is 4" thick--the thickness of the pitman and aprox 4" wide and 6" , long--length not being the problem here

So if you are following me along at approx. 3 " from the end of the pitman a square cut out has to be removed with dimensions approx. 41\8"by 7.5"in length--the extra length of opening being used for the passage of a slightly tapered wooden wedge that will pass through the 6" width of the pitman just above the cavity for the bearing

In your minds eye you probably will say that there is not much wood left, and you are right, and the old millwrights knew this so a special length of 3\16th by 4" steel band is fashioned stretching from well above the cut out around the end of the pitman and up an equal distance on the other side, this steel hammer strap will need to be accurately cut out at all the openings and well fitted snugly at all turns--good sharp bends--

this hammer strap is secured at the upper ends with 2--- 1\2" carriage bolts and at the lower end, now get this--at this point the end of the pitman is fashioned into a 2 by 2" by 1\2" thick tenant which will snuggly fit through an opening in the hammer stap, and I mean tight, no fooling around--

Have you all followed me so far?

enjoy NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #33246 11/04/15 08:14 PM
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Jay White Cloud Offline
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I am doing my best but trying to find old pictures of some...Is there ways to get photos of this, or is an additional blog chronicling these efforts? It sounds (what I can make of it) a very interesting build/restoration...

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #33247 11/05/15 10:46 PM
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Dave Shepard Offline
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I really enjoy checking in on this thread, but don't often have a lot to say. I always look forward to reading any new posts in here.


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Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #33248 11/05/15 11:14 PM
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Jay White Cloud Offline
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NH...to second what Dave said...I think you would be surprised at home many of us "check in" on your posts. I think most us would love to pay you a visit and see all the things you are up to!

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #33251 11/09/15 03:20 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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hello everyone tonight

thanks for the replies, it gives me an incentive to continue to try and put forth what I consider interesting as well as educational material, that has a connection with historic framing, in the sense that if any of you would during your careers happen to be faced with or know someone who might be confronted with a similar task could work their way through it, in this case constructing or reconstructing historic mill structures as well as their associated equipment

To continue with the reconstruction of the power and drive train in a 1865 water powered vertical blade mill, we are at this point still working on the lower adjustable pitman bearing--

We have the pitman at this point mortised out to accept the insertable bearing unit, the pitman has been reinforced with a specially forged and shaped hammerstrap--now back to the bearing itself--

The wood bearing dimensions will be roughly 4" wide, 4" thick and 6" long, of solid good quality white oak

Through the centre of the block a hole is created which in my case was 3-", the exact size of the pin on the offset crank referred to previously --now this has to be done with care using callipers on the pin to ensure a very tight fit. Do not worry about too tight when I say tight I mean real tight, it will quickly wear, and will not overheat due to the water lubrication. In fact the friction will glass the surface of the wood and create a real hard wear surface.

Now this block is cut through the centre of the pin hole, creating an upper and lower section. The cutting action will create a very small amount of room for tightening when the bearing is worn in during the initial running of the new bearing, and should bottom out

Now we get back to the some additional work needed on the adjustable wood bearing

Try and follow me--up the edges of both sections of the bearing, as well as across the bottom-- 2 mortises are let in to accept a "u" shaped strap 1\8th " thick by 1.25" wide--this strap is fastened solidly to the bottom section with 4--flat head #10 screws--2 on each side--the top section of the bearing will slide down on top of the bottom section being held in place by the guiding groves and the upper part of the strap, that is securely fastened to the lower section

Here again care needs to be taken to work accurately to ensure a tight fit

Now the bearing is inserted in the pitman and we will continue to the next step--we are not done yet----

enjoy

NH

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