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Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35980 02/02/23 11:02 PM
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Jim Rogers Offline
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NH: Sorry for the delay in getting the forum back up and running. It seems that the license had run out and it took me a while to find the correct webpage to renew it. Now, their system requires a $30 monthly fee to keep this up and running. I paid that fee to get it restored and open. As well as the new license fee (which I donated).
I have asked the guild to pay this fee to keep this forum going.
They have informed me that they do not wish to support this bulletin board forum anymore, because and I quote "no one uses it."
As the administrator, I check this site at least three times a day for any new subscribers. And usually see at least 30 to 40 people viewing the forum(s). In many different threads and stories.
I'm not totally sure what's going to happen.
They have asked me to "back up" all of these stories and threads. But honestly, I don't have a clue how to do that.
It's up and running now, but not sure for how long.
Jim Rogers


Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35981 02/03/23 12:38 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonite

Hii Jim

We go back along way, although we have never met, you sure made my day when this forum began again.

I have been in touch with Eric and some of the staff there, to give me some explanation why this forum dissapeared, and repeated concerns that I had I thought maybe it was something I had done

Now I know the real story thanks to you!
And thanks for temporarily refreshing the site, out,of your own pocket!
I think you realize my thread wanders a little, but I like to lead people, and teach people, about how timberframing is not only about homes but encompasses great expanses of knowledge

I have to leave now but will return

Richard

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35982 02/03/23 01:38 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonite

Jim you know I was looking down the list of members, which I had never done before, and was amazed by the number of names that have visited my thread,

No one can tell me that this forum is not used extensively, it by all means is, the proof is in the pudding, and I encourage as many as possible to express their interest by dropping by and saying hello and giving a thumb up for a sign of support!

Richard casselman
The northern hewer

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35983 02/03/23 04:35 PM
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Jim Rogers Offline
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Thanks Richard.

Jim Rogers


Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35984 02/03/23 08:43 PM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello Jim

Just a note, please send me an email at, ---richard2@xplornet.ca--- just to establish a personal contact

Thanks in advance

Richard

NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35985 02/03/23 08:56 PM
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Ken Hume Offline
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Hi Jim and Richard (et al),

A lot of us spent a great deal of time building the knowledge base contained in this forum and it would be wrong to assume that just because no one is currently actively posting on this forum that it's relevance has diminished, however things have moved on.

Instead of everyone gathering together in one spot framers now have their own Facebook, Twitter or Instagram accounts where they can post with relative ease and remain firmly in control of persons who visit and content posted.

The fees quoted to run the forum seem very high. I know that the annual bill to run The Oxfordshire Woodland Group forum is about £25 ($30).

There are a good number of timber-framing afficionados who regularly frequent the timber framing section of The Forestry Forum demonstrating that there is still a need for an active forum on this topic.

Where did The TFG go wrong ?


Looking back to see the way ahead !
Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35986 02/03/23 09:00 PM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonite


Just to pickup from a previous post, on the rescue of a disappearing historic structure,, and it's many challenges, I can honestly say, having personally experienced it, I watched the long 45 foot timbers roll in that would become the long mud sills and the upper main plates of a 3 bay barn, to become part of the permanent collection of buildings at UCV

What was really intimidating was the size. especially of the large ends. ( over 40 inches), knowing full well the finished square would only be 12inches, all the remainder waist!

The hewing process was on site, open to public scrutiny, no short cuts allowed!

Bye for now
NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35987 02/04/23 02:26 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonite

Thanks for coming on board ken, I can always count on you for constructive conversation, and I guess that is what makes the world go around.

I do wish that those who view silently, TTRAG related content expressed here, would once in awhile say hello (some do) and to them, i say thanks.

I also realize , probably not as much as you ken, that the world is changing in the area of access to knowledge both giving and taking, but having said that it is nice to listen to, original talk on the subject.

I more than anyone realize my thread wanders into areas that might not be classified as timberframing, but I found out any moons ago, that timberframing, with hewing as an integral part, is an end product of many historical structures, which couldn't exist without the knowledge to use the axes, chisels , mallets ,and I might say sweat, sore hands, and above all else one neighbour helping another.

Maybe I have it all wrong, but a creation, be it a home, outbuilding, mill, an A frame bridge , bakery, barn drive shed , is all mixed up with timberframing, and hewing as its binding agent

Thanks again for visiting

Richard casselman. UE
The northern hewer

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35988 02/06/23 02:41 AM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonite

Just to carry on my thread relating to reconstruction of the Ross barn at UCV, It was one of the highlights of my career.
Many would say well it's only a barn, that was true! ,but, the reconstruction was to be carried out in front of the visiting public, using only historic tools, trained costumed staff, details of the original workmanship, such as timber sizes, type, pin placement, placement of foundation stones at strategic points, inside finish details, flooring, roof boarding, nails,siding and corner finish details, roofing shingles, roof eve finish details, rafter framing, large and small doors and blacksmith hardware for each,

Then the raising of the frame was accomplished using horse and manpower alone.
Time allotment for this whole project was set out for three seasons of 5 months each, a very strict deadline, and advertised in segments of progress.

I will return enjoy!
NH

Re: historic hewing questionnaire [Re: northern hewer] #35989 02/07/23 10:23 PM
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northern hewer Offline OP
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Hello everyone tonite

In my last post to continue, on the second level of the barn frame stood the purlin posts and their plates, that sat on their tops, tying everything together, with braces at each intersecting point.

I might point out these purlin plates were smallish in cross section, only measuring 7by8 inches, 48 feet in length. Handling them into position was tricky, because of their length, they could break very easily!

Got to leave now
Richard

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