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#8386 - 03/03/03 01:55 PM Tool Forum?
Jim Rogers Online   confused

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Registered: 03/14/02
Posts: 1661
Loc: Georgetown, MA, USA
What this new tool Forum all about?
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#8387 - 03/04/03 07:06 PM Re: Tool Forum?
Joel McCarty Offline
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Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 344
Loc: Alstead Center NH USA
This forum was created in response to a user request. We'd like to get questions and answers about tools over in this spot, instead of in the general forum area.

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#8388 - 03/05/03 01:22 PM Re: Tool Forum?
Jim Rogers Online   confused

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Registered: 03/14/02
Posts: 1661
Loc: Georgetown, MA, USA
Will we be allowed to list tools for sale in this section?
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#8389 - 03/05/03 04:14 PM Re: Tool Forum?
Joel McCarty Offline
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Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 344
Loc: Alstead Center NH USA
I could use a little member guidance on this issue. My first impulse is to restrict tool sales to non-commercial transactions.

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#8390 - 03/05/03 06:35 PM Re: Tool Forum?
daiku Offline

Member

Registered: 04/16/02
Posts: 893
Loc: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Many timber framing tools are very specialized. If not here, then where? I could point to a precedent: the guild allows members to post tools for sale in the newsletter. Just my $.02. CB.
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#8391 - 03/05/03 11:58 PM Re: Tool Forum?
Jim Rogers Online   confused

Member

Registered: 03/14/02
Posts: 1661
Loc: Georgetown, MA, USA
If this forum is not for tools for sale, then what is it for? Just to talk about tools? Well then let's talk about them. I know a place where you can get some commanders custom made. Do you want to know where? Call me 800-422-6250.
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#8392 - 03/06/03 02:54 PM Re: Tool Forum?
Joel McCarty Offline
Member

Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 344
Loc: Alstead Center NH USA
Post away.

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#8393 - 03/06/03 04:22 PM Re: Tool Forum?
Greg E Offline
Member

Registered: 03/18/02
Posts: 23
Loc: SW Ohio
Here some random topics re: chisels:

1) I'm a satisfied 1 1/2" Barr chisel owner. It was originally sharpened with a micro bevel, as they recommend that. I'm told micro bevels are good for framing chisels for chopping & mortising work. Curious what other timberframers think about micro bevels.

2) Secondly, I just noticed another Barr chisel I've never seen or heard of before. They call it a swan neck chisel. Curved to allow easier access to clearing out mortise bottoms. (For those of us who still do it manually...)

Here's a pic, check it out:

http://www.barrtools.com

(BTB, I'm not financially affiliated with Barr whatsoever, just a satisfied customer.)

3) I've been looking for awhile to find & buy an old corner chisel and re-hab it. Not too sucessful, so I may end up buying one new. I'm still wondering though, how in the heck do you sharpen a corner chisel?!

Cheers,
Greg

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#8394 - 03/06/03 09:49 PM Re: Tool Forum?
Jim Rogers Online   confused

Member

Registered: 03/14/02
Posts: 1661
Loc: Georgetown, MA, USA
I flatten the back sides of my corner chisel same as you would any chisel. Then I created a block of wood with the correct angle cut on the end as a file guide. Then clamped the block and chisel in a vice and held it in an appropriate position so that I could file it with a hand file, first one side then the other. It took a while but came out sharp and I'm happy with it. Jim
PS. I might have some corner chisels for sale soon, a blacksmith friend of mine has some, and he's suppose to bring them over on or before this Saturday. I'll let you know, when they are here.
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#8395 - 03/07/03 06:02 PM Re: Tool Forum?
Leon Buckwalter Offline
Member

Registered: 05/28/02
Posts: 24
Loc: SUNY Alfred State College
A microbevel provides a way around the need to hone the entire surface of the main bevel each time you sharpen. Honing with a fine grit stone removes material slowly; the larger the area the slower.

The down side is that each time you hone the microbevel it grows in size. Being a steeper angle, this will eventually change the geometry of the cutting edge to the point that you'll have to grind it away and restore the proper angle. I try to minimize grinding, especially at the thin leading edge where heat builds quickly to the point that you'll ruin the steel's temper.

An alternative that also reduces the area to be honed is called hollow-grinding. Instead of shooting for a uniform, flat bevel, very carefully grind out material above the cutting edge, creating a depression, or hollow. When honing, the forward and trailing edges of the bevel will still ride the stone and create the proper angle, while polishing a minimal amount of surface area.

I don't think a swan-neck chisel will find much use in timberframing, where the mortices are usually large enough to turn a framing chisel bevel-side down to clear the bottom. Short, deep mortices, such as those for the old-fashioned locksets cut into the edges of doors, might require a swan-neck.

As Jim says, the outside of a corner chisel is the easy part. You can do some shaping inside with a file, but they don't leave a polished surface and cutting edge. Have you ever noticed that a lot of antique corner chisels have a long point at the corner? That's the result of honing with a stone, which eventually gets rounded over on the edge, and doesn't take as much material out of the inside corner. The further you hone back the wings, and the more your stone gets rounded over, the more pronounced the point. A diamond plate, which won't wear away and round over, can be used for all but the finest polishing on the inside corner.

Most chisel sharpening is done with the stone on a bench, and the chisel held at the proper angle.
I've found it better to clamp down the corner chisel to sharpen the inside edges, and move the stone. I can keep track of where I am better that way. I use the same technique with slicks, axes, and other tools where it's awkward to hold the tool properly or to see what's going on.

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